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Member Profile

Member Name: realnasaphotos
Country: USA
State/Region: California
City: Playa del Rey
Favorite Place to Watch the Sunset: Saturn

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Member's Sunset and Sunrise Photos

  • Clusters of Massive Stars by Hubble Telescope
    Clusters of Massive Stars.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Clusters of Massive Stars by Hubble Telescope
    "Although best known for its visible-light images, Hubble also observes over a limited range of infrared light. The galactic center is marked by the bright patch in the lower right. Along the left side are large arcs of warm gas that have been heated by clusters of bright massive stars. In addition, Hubble uncovered many more massive stars across the region. Winds and radiation from these stars create the complex structures seen in the gas throughout the image.This sweeping panorama is one of the sharpest infrared pictures ever made of the galactic center region." - NASA official site This is an official NASA image. Great mix of black and yellow, would like amazing on any wall and as a metal print!
 
  • Comets in Helix Nebula in Constellation Aquarius
    Comets in Helix Nebula in.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Comets in Helix Nebula in Constellation Aquarius
    "This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Helix nebula, a cosmic starlet often photographed by amateur astronomers for its vivid colors and eerie resemblance to a giant eye. The nebula, located about 700 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, belongs to a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these colorful beauties were named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets like Jupiter. Planetary nebulae are the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years. In Spitzer's infrared view of the Helix nebula, the eye looks more like that of a green monster's. Infrared light from the outer gaseous layers is represented in blues and greens. The white dwarf is visible as a tiny white dot in the center of the picture. The red color in the middle of the eye denotes the final layers of gas blown out when the star died. The brighter red circle in the very center is the glow of a dusty disk circling the white dwarf (the disk itself is too small to be resolved). This dust, discovered by Spitzer's infrared heat-seeking vision, was most likely kicked up by comets that survived the death of their star. Before the star died, its comets and possibly planets would have orbited the star in an orderly fashion. But when the star blew off its outer layers, the icy bodies and outer planets would have been tossed about and into each other, resulting in an ongoing cosmic dust storm. Any inner planets in the system would have burned up or been swallowed as their dying star expanded." - NASA Official Site. This photo was taken by NASA. Highly recommended for framed images.
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  • The Milky Way Galaxy From Above
    The Milky Way Galaxy From.. 
    realnasaphotos
    The Milky Way Galaxy From Above
    An artist's impressions by NASA and Caltech of how the Milky Way Galaxy would appear from above. It is believed there are two main spiral arms starting from opposite ends of the central bar you see here. Our sun lies in the Orion Spur, just below the center of the image.
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  • Galactic Metropolis As Seen 9.6 Billion Years Ago
    Galactic Metropolis As Se.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Galactic Metropolis As Seen 9.6 Billion Years Ago
    "A surprisingly large collection of galaxies (red dots in center) stands out at a remarkably large distance in this composite image combining infrared and visible-light observations. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope contributed to the infrared component of the observations, while shorter-wavelength infrared and visible data are provided by Japan's Subaru telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Looking out to this distance, the cluster appears as it was 9.6 billion years ago, only about three billion years after the Big Bang. Astronomers were surprised to find such a "modern" cluster at an era when its peers tended to be much smaller, presumably taking billions of more years to collect enough galaxies to reach such a size." - NASA
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  • Dead Star Causing Universal Anarchy
    Dead Star Causing Univers.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Dead Star Causing Universal Anarchy
    "A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. Now, almost a thousand years later, a superdense neutron star left behind by the stellar death is spewing out a blizzard of extremely high-energy particles into the expanding debris field known as the Crab Nebula. This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray image is shown in light blue, the Hubble Space Telescope optical images are in green and dark blue, and the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared image is in red. The size of the X-ray image is smaller than the others because ultrahigh-energy X-ray emitting electrons radiate away their energy more quickly than the lower-energy electrons emitting optical and infrared light. The neutron star, which has the mass equivalent to the sun crammed into a rapidly spinning ball of neutrons twelve miles across, is the bright white dot in the center of the image." - NASA The Crab Nebula stellar explosion of 1054 AD was bright enough to be seen in the daytime for over a month. Display this historical photo on your wall.
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  • Hot Gas Bubble in Constellation Ursa Major
    Hot Gas Bubble in Constel.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Hot Gas Bubble in Constellation Ursa Major
    "A lumpy bubble of hot gas rises from a cauldron of glowing matter in a distant galaxy, as seen by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers suspect the bubble is being blown by 'winds' or high-speed streams of particles, released during a burst of star formation. The bubble's lumpy surface has four columns of gaseous filaments towering above the galaxy's disc. The filaments whirl around in a vortex and are expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down on the disc and may collide with gas clouds, compress them and form a new generation of stars. Theoretical models indicate the bubble formed when winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of hot gas from supernova explosions. Radio telescope observations indicate those processes are still active. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. The images, taken in 1998, show glowing gas as red and starlight as blue/green." - Official NASA website. Incredible shot, almost looks as if the universe is ripping open.
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  • Galactic Center Region of Milky Way
    Galactic Center Region of.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Galactic Center Region of Milky Way
    "X-rays detected by Chandra expose a wealth of exotic objects and high-energy features. In this image, pink represents lower energy X-rays and blue indicates higher energy. Hundreds of small dots show emission from material around black holes and other dense stellar objects. A supermassive black hole -- some four million times more massive than the Sun -- resides within the bright region in the lower right. The diffuse X-ray light comes from gas heated to millions of degrees by outflows from the supermassive black hole, winds from giant stars, and stellar explosions. This central region is the most energetic place in our galaxy." - NASA Note: This is an official NASA produced image.
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  • Young Stars in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud
    Young Stars in the Rho Op.. 
    realnasaphotos
    Young Stars in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud
    "Newborn stars peek out from beneath their natal blanket of dust in this dynamic image of the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Called "Rho Oph" by astronomers, it's one of the closest star-forming regions to our own solar system. Located near the constellations Scorpius and Ophiuchus, the nebula is about 407 light years away from Earth. Rho Oph is a complex made up of a large main cloud of molecular hydrogen, a key molecule allowing new stars to form from cold cosmic gas, with two long streamers trailing off in different directions. Recent studies using the latest X-ray and infrared observations reveal more than 300 young stellar objects within the large central cloud. Their median age is only 300,000 years, very young compared to some of the universe's oldest stars, which are more than 12 billion years old. The colors in this image reflect the relative temperatures and evolutionary states of the various stars. The youngest stars are surrounded by dusty disks of gas from which they, and their potential planetary systems, are forming. These young disk systems show up as red in this image. Some of these young stellar objects are surrounded by their own compact nebulae. More evolved stars, which have shed their natal material, are blue." - Official NASA Site. This is an official NASA image.
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  • Infrared Coronet Cluster Shot By Spitzer Telescope
    Infrared Coronet Cluster .. 
    realnasaphotos
    Infrared Coronet Cluster Shot By Spitzer Telescope
    "While perhaps not quite as well known as its star formation cousin of Orion, the Corona Australis region (containing, at its heart, the Coronet cluster) is one of the nearest and most active regions of ongoing star formation. The Spitzer image shows young stars plus diffuse emission from dust." - Official NASA website. This photo was provided by NASA. It is one of the most beautiful regions in the universe. Prints extremely well.
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